Ubuntu is now installing

How to install Ubuntu on VirtualBox

If you are trying to install Ubuntu on a VirtualBox you came to the right place.

In this post, I will show you how to step by step install Ubuntu into a VM (virtual machine) using VirtualBox.

Just to clarify, a VM (virtual machine) is basically a computer inside your machine. You will have to specify things like: how much RAM memory, how much storage space and how many cores will have the CPU, in addition to what OS (operating system) you want to install.

  1. Download and install VirtualBox

  2. Download the version of Ubuntu you want to install

  3. Create VM

    1. Click ‘New’ and add a Name, Type, and Version

      Click New button
      Click New button

      Click the button at the top left that says “New”. A window will pop up asking you for a Name, Type, and Version. If you put the name as “Ubuntu” the type and version will be autoselected. Make sure the version is the same as the one of the Ubuntu file that you have just downloaded. For example: if the name of the ubuntu installer is “ubuntu-16.04.3-desktop-amd64.iso”  that means that the version of the VM needs to be 64-bit.

    2. Add as much Memory Size as possible

      Add RAM memory
      Add RAM memory

      This is the RAM memory for your VM. The more RAM memory you have the faster will perform.

    3. Add a Virtual Hard Disk

      Create a virtual hard disk
      Create a virtual hard disk
      Select hard disk file type
      Select hard disk file type – VDI
      Storage on physical hard disk - Fixed Size
      Storage on physical hard disk – Fixed Size 

       

      Allocate storage
      Allocate storage

      This is the actual storage of your VM, where all of your data, including files, will be stored. Depending on your needs you might want to give more or less space. It recommends 10GB by default, but I usually give it around 40GB. When you click ‘Create’ it will start creating the Virtual Hard Disk. By default is saving the disk image in your C:/ partition, if you would like to change the location where the file is saved just press the folder icon next to the name.

  4. Edit the SETTINGS of the VM

    You should now have a virtual machine created. Select the VM and click the yellow Settings button.

    1. Settings -> General -> Advanced

      Choose Bidirectional
      Choose Bidirectional

      This will allow you to Copy and Paste from your computer into the VM.

    2. Settings -> System -> Processor

      Give as many processors as you can
      Give as many processors as you can

      It’s good practice to usually give 50% of your CPU, in my case I have 8 CPUs, therefore I’m giving 4 CPUs to the VM. It will help the VM to process things faster and not be too slow.

    3. Settings -> Display -> Screen

      Video Memory
      Video Memory

      Try to give it the full 128 MB of video memory. This will help it render stuff faster and move smoother as well. In addition, if you would like to have your VM on more than just one monitor you can enable that by changing the ‘Monitor Count’ to 2.  You can now close the settings window and start your VM by double-clicking on it.

  5. Select Start-Up Disk

    Select start-up disk
    Select start-up disk

    Select the Ubuntu installer that you have downloaded earlier and click start. That will take you through the Ubuntu installing process.

  6. Install Ubuntu

    1. Select the language you want and click ‘Install Ubuntu’.

      Install Ubuntu
      Install Ubuntu
    2. Download updates while installing Ubuntu

      Download updated while installing Ubuntu
      Check the box – Download updated while installing Ubuntu
    3. Erase disk and install Ubuntu

      Erase disk and install Ubuntu
      Erase disk and install Ubuntu

      If you really need this VM to be secure you can choose the second option or the third option for more advanced usage. In my case, this is just a test so the first option works just fine. Click install now. (If a message box pops up you can just click continue. This is just a VM so nothing will be lost from your personal computer).

    4. Select time zone

      Select time zone
      Select time zone
    5. Select Keyboard Layout

      Keyboard Layout
      Keyboard Layout
    6. Choose Credentials

      Choose your credentials
      Choose your credentials

      For security purposes, it’s a good idea to require the password everytime you log in. You can just select the first option and it will not ask you to enter a password everytime you open the VM.

    7. Ubuntu is now installing

      Ubuntu is now installing
      Ubuntu is now installing
    8. Installation completed. Reboot

      Installation completed. Reboot
      Installation completed. Reboot
    9. Ubuntu Installed

      Ubuntu is installed. Enjoy
      Ubuntu is installed. Enjoy

Ubuntu is now installed on your VM. Have a look through the settings and feel free to make any adjustments to make your VM work faster.

As always, if you have any questions I will answer them in the comment section.

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